Top College News Subscribe to the Newsletter

Have you ever wanted to be a flower on a wall?

The Beacon talks with Logan Lerman, who plays Charlie in the new blockbuster film “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”

Staff Writer tobint16@up.edu

Published: Thursday, October 11, 2012

Updated: Thursday, October 11, 2012 01:10

Wallflower

Photo courtesy of Summit Entertainment

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

You may recognize Logan Lerman, as Percy Jackson, or D’Artagnan from “The Three Musketeers” (2011), but this year, people everywhere will see him as Charlie — the soul-searching teen in Stephen Chbosky’s novel-turned film, “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.” For those who have not read the book, Charlie is a troubled adolescent who learns about trust, friendship and “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” through the wacky people he meets during his freshman year in high school. Lerman participated in a conference call with other student-journalists to discuss his role as Charlie and the film as a whole.

 

How did you prepare to play the role of Charlie?

There was a lot of preparation. The number one thing for me was isolating myself with the material and figuring it out Charlie’s intentions behind his lines. It was pretty tricky getting in the mind of such a naïve, sweet, [and] genuine guy. We’re pretty different, but he reminded me of people I’ve known growing up. I understood his perspective.

Do you feel like the movie faithfully portrayed the book?

I read the book and I feel like it was structured very well. [Stephen Chbosky] knew what the movie needed to give it a good arc, he was the screenwriter for the movie. More ground could definitely be covered in any movie, but it would be really freaking long. I was pretty happy with it. I feel like it’s a faithful adaptation of the book.

What was it like playing a role with such high expectations from people who love the book?

Actors in general are really judging our [own] work and if it’s good enough. It was fuel for the fire [playing Charlie]. We didn’t know what it was going to be. We were working our assess off. [It was] one of the greatest work experiences we’ll all have.

What was it like to work with such great actors and actresses?

All the people that were part of the project are people I’ve always wanted to work with. Some of them were friends of mine before the film; some of them I admired as actors. They’re incredible actors and equally great people. It was a wonderful collaboration. The whole cast was awesome we had a really good time.

What was your favorite line and scene from the movie?

The [line] that really stuck with me the most is the one they have been using a lot for advertising as well: We accept the love we think we deserve. That was one of my favorite lines in the whole script.

I love the whole Charlie getting stoned for the whole time scene. I thought that was a lot fun. We had a particularly good time doing that. It was a light scene, so it was a fun little break from the depressing scenes that were hard to get into. I like that scene a lot.

What did you think of the “Rocky Horror Picture Show” scene?

We shot the movie in the same town that Steve grew up in and where the book takes place. We went to his childhood theatre where he watched the Rocky Horror Picture Show. The whole cast and a bunch of the crew went to see the show. I really went in with no expectations and didn’t know anything about it, but I was f***ing scared after seeing that. F*** I need to wear a gold thong. [During the scene it was] uncomfortable. I feel really bad saying this, but I’m usually one to go 100%, but there was a good hour-long conversation where I was begging the cast to [let me wear] briefs, or something like that. Everyone was like ‘no, you’re not doing that.’ It was nice to go out [wearing that] with the other guys, [too].

Do you feel the characters are relatable?

They’re definitely relatable for me, but I can’t speak for everybody. At least from my perspective, I’ve known all the characters throughout my life—similar to Patrick and Sam, and everybody involved. I hope other people [relate] as well. [Also, the] common themes are relatable. Everyone at that age is discovering who [they] are, and discovering yourself is a huge thing.

What is your advice to people going through a situation like Charlie’s?

Walk up to someone at your school and [get] to know them. [Become] friends with someone and [confide] in them. Validate whatever feelings you have in your life.

What is the number one thing people should take away from the movie?

Just entertainment. Above that, if anybody was going to take [something] away from it, it’s feeling secure with who you are, and feeling comfortable in your own skin — feeling free basically.

1 comments





log out